100 books for the little ones.

I was contacted today by Candace at TeachersFirst, noting that I had infringed on some copyrights, posting that entire list.  Here instead is an excerpt, with a link to their site.  You can get book recommendations there broken down by grade or age.

Here
is a list of one hundred books selected by the National Education
Association as great reading for children and young people. To help
make these books more useful, we have added book and author links to
any TeachersFirst resources and lesson ideas. For more reading ideas –
including books grouped by theme and grade levle – check out the
hundreds of titles in our Suggested Reading section.

Books for All Ages

The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein 
Where the Sidewalk Ends: the Poems and Drawing of Shel Silverstein by Shel Silverstein 
Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
The Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum
Heidi by Johanna Spyri 

Books for Preschoolers – More Preschool Titles from TeachersFirst / TeachersAndFamilies

The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle 
Goodnight Moon by Margaret Wise Brown
Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What do you see? by Bill Martin, Jr.
The Rainbow Fish by Marcus Pfister
Corduroy by Don Freeman
The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats
The Runaway Bunny by Margaret Wise 
Guess How Much I Love You by Sam McBratney 

Books for Children Ages 4-8 – More Primary Reading from TeachersFirst / TeachersAndFamilies\u003c/a\>\u003c/p\>\u003cblockquote\>\u003cp\>\u003cem\>The Polar Express\u003c/em\> by Chris Van Allsburg \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>Green Eggs and Ham\u003c/em\> by Dr. Seuss \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>The Cat in the Hat\u003c/em\> by Dr. Seuss \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>Where the Wild Things Are \u003c/em\>by Maurice Sendak \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>Love You Forever\u003c/em\> by Robert N. Munsch \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day\u003c/em\> by Judith Viorst \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>The Mitten\u003c/em\> by Jan Brett \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>Stellaluna\u003c/em\> by Janell Cannon \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>Oh, The Places You'll Go\u003c/em\> by Dr. Seuss \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>Strega Nona\u003c/em\> by Tomie De Paola \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>The Velveteen Rabbit\u003c/em\> by Margery Williams \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>How the Grinch Stole Christmas\u003c/em\> by Dr. Seuss \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>The True Story of the Three Little Pigs\u003c/em\> by Jon Scieszka \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>Chicka Chicka Boom Boom\u003c/em\> by John Archambault \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>The Complete Tales of Winnie the Pooh\u003c/em\> by A. A. Milne \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>If You Give a Mouse a Cookie\u003c/em\> by Laura Joffe Numeroff \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>The Lorax\u003c/em\> by Dr. Seuss \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>Amazing Grace\u003c/em\> by Mary Hoffman \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>Jumanji\u003c/em\> by Chris Van Allsburg \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>Math Curse\u003c/em\> by Jon Scieszka \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>Are You My Mother?\u003c/em\> by Philip D. Eastman\u003cbr\>\u003cem\>The Napping House\u003c/em\> by Audrey Wood \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>Sylvester and the Magic Pebble\u003c/em\> by William Steig \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>The Tale of Peter Rabbit\u003c/em\> by Beatrix Potter \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>Horton Hatches the Egg\u003c/em\> by Dr. Seuss \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>Basil of Baker Street\u003c/em\> by Eve Titus\u003cbr\>\u003cem\>The Little Engine That Could\u003c/em\> by Watty Piper \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>Curious George\u003c/em\> by Hans Augusto Rey \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>Wilfrid Gordon McDonald Partridge\u003c/em\> by Mem Fox \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>Arthur\u003c/em\> series by Marc Tolon Brown \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>Lilly's Purple Plastic Purse \u003c/em\>by Kevin Henkes\u003cbr\>\u003cem\>The Little House\u003c/em\> by Virginia Lee Burton \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>Amelia Bedelia\u003c/em\> by Peggy Parish\u003cbr\>\u003cem\>The Art Lesson\u003c/em\> by Tomie De Paola \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>Caps for Sale\u003c/em\> by Esphyr Slobodkina “,1]
);

//–>More Primary Reading from TeachersFirst / TeachersAndFamilies

The Polar Express by Chris Van Allsburg 
Green Eggs and Ham by Dr. Seuss 
The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss
Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak 
Love You Forever by Robert N. Munsch
Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day by Judith Viorst   
The Mitten by Jan Brett 
Stellaluna by Janell Cannon
Oh, The Places You’ll Go by Dr. Seuss
Strega Nona by Tomie De Paola 
The Velveteen Rabbit by Margery Williams
How the Grinch Stole Christmas by Dr. Seuss 
The True Story of the Three Little Pigs by Jon Scieszka
Chicka Chicka Boom Boom by John Archambault 
The Complete Tales of Winnie the Pooh by A. A. Milne 
If You Give a Mouse a Cookie by Laura Joffe Numeroff 
The Lorax by Dr. Seuss 
Amazing Grace by Mary Hoffman 
Jumanji by Chris Van Allsburg
Math Curse by Jon Scieszka
Are You My Mother? by Philip D. Eastman
The Napping House by Audrey Wood 
Sylvester and the Magic Pebble by William Steig
The Tale of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter 
Horton Hatches the Egg by Dr. Seuss 
Basil of Baker Street by Eve Titus
The Little Engine That Could by Watty Piper
Curious George by Hans Augusto Rey 
Wilfrid Gordon McDonald Partridge by Mem Fox 
Arthur series by Marc Tolon Brown 
Lilly’s Purple Plastic Purse by Kevin Henkes
The Little House by Virginia Lee Burton
Amelia Bedelia by Peggy Parish
The Art Lesson by Tomie De Paola
Caps for Sale by Esphyr Slobodkina  \u003cem\>Clifford, the Big Red Dog\u003c/em\> by Norman Bridwell \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>The Paper Bag Princess\u003c/em\> by Robert N. Munsch \u003c/p\>\u003c/blockquote\>\u003cp\>Books for Children Ages 9-12 – \u003ca href\u003d\”http://www.teachersfirst.com/read-sel.cfm\” target\u003d\”_blank\” onclick\u003d\”return top.js.OpenExtLink(window,event,this)\”\>More Books by Grade Level from TeachersFirst \u003c/a\>\u003c/p\>\u003cblockquote\>\u003cp\>\u003cem\>Charlotte's Web\u003c/em\> by E. B. White \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>Hatchet\u003c/em\> by \u003ca href\u003d\”http://www.teachersfirst.com/tchr-keyword.cfm?keyword\u003dpaulsen&lower\u003d1&upper\u003d12&Submit4\u003dSearch%2Bby%2Bkeyword\” target\u003d\”_blank\” onclick\u003d\”return top.js.OpenExtLink(window,event,this)\”\>Gary Paulsen\u003c/a\> \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe\u003c/em\> by C. S. Lewis \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>Bridge to Terabithia\u003c/em\> by \u003ca href\u003d\”http://www.teachersfirst.com/tchr-keyword.cfm?keyword\u003dpaterson&lower\u003d1&upper\u003d12&Submit4\u003dSearch%2Bby%2Bkeyword\” target\u003d\”_blank\” onclick\u003d\”return top.js.OpenExtLink(window,event,this)\”\>Katherine Paterson\u003c/a\> \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>Charlie and the Chocolate Factory\u003c/em\> by Roald Dahl \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>A Wrinkle in Time\u003c/em\> by Madeleine L'Engle \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>Shiloh\u003c/em\> by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>Little House on the Prarie\u003c/em\> by \u003ca href\u003d\”http://www.teachersfirst.com/tchr-keyword.cfm?keyword\u003dwilder&lower\u003d1&upper\u003d12&Submit4\u003dSearch%2Bby%2Bkeyword\” target\u003d\”_blank\” onclick\u003d\”return top.js.OpenExtLink(window,event,this)\”\>Laura Ingalls Wilder \u003c/a\>\u003cbr\>\u003cem\>The Secret Garden\u003c/em\> by Frances Hodgson Burnett \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>The Boxcar Children\u003c/em\> by Gertrude Chandler Warner \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>Sarah, Plain and Tall \u003c/em\>by Patricia MacLachlan \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>The Indian in the Cupboard\u003c/em\> by Lynne Reid Banks \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>Island of the Blue Dolphins\u003c/em\> by Scott O'Dell \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>Maniac Magee \u003c/em\>by Jerry Spinelli \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>The BFG\u003c/em\> by Roald Dahl \u003cbr\>\u003cem\>The Giver\u003c/em\> by \u003ca href\u003d\”http://www.teachersfirst.com/tchr-keyword.cfm?keyword\u003dlowry&lower\u003d1&upper\u003d12&Submit4\u003dSearch%2Bby%2Bkeyword\” target\u003d\”_blank\” onclick\u003d\”return top.js.OpenExtLink(window,event,this)\”\>Lois Lowry \u003c/a\>\u003cbr\>\u003cem\>James and the Giant Peach: A Children's Story”,1]
);

//–>
Clifford, the Big Red Dog by Norman Bridwell 
The Paper Bag Princess by Robert N. Munsch

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6 thoughts on “100 books for the little ones.

  1. Whose copyright? TeachersFirst or the NEA? Shouldn’t the point really be to get titles in front of parents and encourage literacy rather than worry about who has rights to a list?

    [Sorry, former 3rd & 4th grade teacher here. Still bitter about education not actually being about educating.]

  2. I could not agree more, marydell, that what it is all about is the kids. TeachersFirst is a free service of a not-for-profit whose mission is exactly that: promoting teaching and learning for the kids. We got permission from NEA to post the list and added lists of our own (selected and reviewed by experienced teachers, by the way) exactly to help out kids. But there are two reasons why we need copyright on our site. Neither prevents getting the word out to promote literacy:

    1. As a not for profit, we rely on word of mouth, not the huge advertising budgets of the “education” mega-corporations, to tell people about our site. We need traffic to continue to obtain the grants that maintain our free, advertising-free service to promote teaching and learning. By sending people to our site, rather than lifting our content, we have a win-win for everyone twice over: good ideas and continued supply of same.

    2. In modeling respect for copyright, we model good practice for our kids. They do not know about “intellectual property,” but they do know that it is wrong to take someone else’s work and put your own name on it, especially without permission. Just because copy/paste is easy does not mean it is right, or legal.

    With the ease of technology, we have left an entire generation of kids without any concept of “being fair” to those who create a work. One very powerful way to correct this is to think out loud as teachers as we model Fair Use and abide by copyright or read and find that something is under a Creative Commons license. Fair Use does not permit publication of a product on the web (the distribution is unlimited). As a teacher, however, you are welcome to visit TeachersFirst and copy our content for your classroom. We are teachers ourselves. We have been there. For me, it was for 27 years in the classroom.

    I certainly value your opinion that it is all for the kids (and the parents), and I hope this has helped provide a different perspective.

    Candace Hackett Shively
    Director of K-12 Initiatives
    http://www.teachersfirst.com

  3. No offense, Candace, but it seems as though you’re up in arms over something minor. You might also want to take a closer look at copyright law, especially how it has been applied to the Internet.

    Technically, the 100 book list belongs to the NEA since they compiled it from a survey of teachers ( http://www.nea.org/readacross/resources/catalist.html ). If anyone could have a beef over its reproduction, it’d be them. TeachersFirst, in essence, is a licensee and not the owner of the content.

    Reproducing the list would more than likely fall under copyright limitation of Fair Use. From what I can tell, this site is not using the NEA’s content in order to generate revenue for itself. It also does not appear to take away revenue from the NEA. And although it would have been fairer to have originally used an excerpt, the intention is clearly to advance the public good by encouraging education.

    I took a quick look at TeachersFirst’s terms of use ( http://www.teachersfirst.com/visitor_agreement.cfm ) and find it extremely interesting that the site endorses framing. As far as I’m concerned, this is an even worse practice than reprinting a list. It actually takes money out of a framee’s pocket by drawing on bandwidth while deceptively making it look like the content belongs to the framer. If you’re really interested in modeling the “concept of ‘being fair’ to those who create a work,” you shouldn’t frame other sites.

    Despite saying “it is all about is the kids,” it clearly isn’t. Condalmo linked to you, so you got your word of mouth and should be grateful for it. Yet, the majority of your comment focused on self-promotion and staking a claim on content that didn’t belong to you in the first place. It isn’t good PR and doesn’t make me enthused about using your site or recommending it to any of my teacher friends.

  4. No offense, Candace, but it seems as though you’re up in arms over something minor. You might also want to take a closer look at copyright law, especially how it has been applied to the Internet.

    Technically, the 100 book list belongs to the NEA since they compiled it from a survey of teachers ( http://www.nea.org/readacross/resources/catalist.html ). If anyone could have a beef over its reproduction, it’d be them. TeachersFirst, in essence, is a licensee and not the owner of the content.

    Reproducing the list would more than likely fall under copyright limitation of Fair Use. From what I can tell, this site is not using the NEA’s content in order to generate revenue for itself. It also does not appear to take away revenue from the NEA. And although it would have been fairer to have originally used an excerpt, the intention is clearly to advance the public good by encouraging education.

    I took a quick look at TeachersFirst’s terms of use ( http://www.teachersfirst.com/visitor_agreement.cfm ) and find it extremely interesting that the site endorses framing. As far as I’m concerned, this is an even worse practice than reprinting a list. It actually takes money out of a framee’s pocket by drawing on bandwidth while deceptively making it look like the content belongs to the framer. If you’re really interested in modeling the “concept of ‘being fair’ to those who create a work,” you shouldn’t frame other sites.

    Despite saying “it is all about is the kids,” it clearly isn’t. Condalmo linked to you, so you got your word of mouth and should be grateful for it. Yet, the majority of your comment focused on self-promotion and staking a claim on content that didn’t belong to you in the first place. It isn’t good PR and doesn’t make me enthused about using your site or recommending it to any of my teacher friends.

  5. marydell,
    “so you got your word of mouth and should be grateful for it”

    I am sorry you are angry with us for requesting attribution. What you perhaps did not realize is that Condalmo’s post above is the result of a change from a version that has been removed. The original post– the one to which we took issue– simply said,

    “Lifted whole cloth from somewhere,”

    then pasted in the entire contents of a page from TeachersFirst, including far more than is here now. The NEA list (which we use by permission), and all of TeachersFirst related content (books by grade, etc, developed by TeachersFirst, not NEA) were listed without attribution.

    We credit Condalmo for an appropriate and swift response.

    If you would like more information on what you call “framing,” and why we provide attribution in reviews and by displaying URLs in a narrow bar with a button to return to search listings, please feel free to contact me directly at webmaster(at) teachersfirst.com

    We are all in this together, really.

  6. marydell,
    “so you got your word of mouth and should be grateful for it”

    I am sorry you are angry with us for requesting attribution. What you perhaps did not realize is that Condalmo’s post above is the result of a change from a version that has been removed. The original post– the one to which we took issue– simply said,

    “Lifted whole cloth from somewhere,”

    then pasted in the entire contents of a page from TeachersFirst, including far more than is here now. The NEA list (which we use by permission), and all of TeachersFirst related content (books by grade, etc, developed by TeachersFirst, not NEA) were listed without attribution.

    We credit Condalmo for an appropriate and swift response.

    If you would like more information on what you call “framing,” and why we provide attribution in reviews and by displaying URLs in a narrow bar with a button to return to search listings, please feel free to contact me directly at webmaster(at) teachersfirst.com

    We are all in this together, really.

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